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Day Trip to the Blue Mountains

Visiting the Three Sisters, Scenic World and the Featherdale Wildlife Park

semi-overcast 19 °C
View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

The one place outside the city that seems to be on everyone's bucket list when they visit Sydney is the stunning Three Sisters sandstone rock formation in the Blue Mountains about 40 miles (60 kilometres) inland at Katoomba on the Great Western Highway.

The Three Sisters Rock Formation in the Blue Mountains

The Three Sisters Rock Formation in the Blue Mountains


Me by the Three Sisters Rock Formation at the Echo Point Lookout

Me by the Three Sisters Rock Formation at the Echo Point Lookout


The Jamison Valley and Blue Mountains

The Jamison Valley and Blue Mountains

According to legend (and immortalised by statues outside neighbouring Scenic World) the three rocks are three sisters from the local Katoomba Tribe who were turned to stone by their tribe's sorcerer to protect them from the unwanted advances of three young men from a neighbouring tribe but that the sorcerer himself was killed in battle before he could turn them back to life again.

Statues of the Sorcerer and the Three Sisters outside Scenic World

Statues of the Sorcerer and the Three Sisters outside Scenic World


Me beside the statue of the Sorcerer outside Scenic World

Me beside the statue of the Sorcerer outside Scenic World

Scenic World itself began life as a coal mine in the 1880s. In 1928 a funicular railway was built to transport miners down the Jamison Valley side to the mine in the rainforest below which turned out to be the steepest passenger railway in the world (52 degrees contained within a total incline distance of 1,316 feet - 415 metres). When the mine closed in 1945 the funicular railway remained as a tourist attraction which became the Scenic World Railway we see today.

The Scenic World Railway about to leave its Top Station for the Rainforest floor

The Scenic World Railway about to leave its Top Station for the Rainforest floor


On our way down to the Rainforest floor aboard the Scenic World Railway

On our way down to the Rainforest floor aboard the Scenic World Railway

Coal Mine entrance on the rainforest floor at Scenic World

Coal Mine entrance on the rainforest floor at Scenic World


The walkway through the Rainforest on the valley floor at Scenic World

The walkway through the Rainforest on the valley floor at Scenic World

Since then the railway has been upgraded (including quite recently in early 2013) and the Scenic Skyway across the valley and Scenic Cableway back up from the rainforest floor added. The Skyway passes across the Katoomba Falls and includes a glass floor that defrosts as you set of so you can look down on the tree tops of the rainforest below.

The Scenic World Skyway making its way across the Rain Forest

The Scenic World Skyway making its way across the Rain Forest


The Katoomba Falls from the Scenic World Skyway

The Katoomba Falls from the Scenic World Skyway


The floor of the Scenic World Skyway defrosts to reveal the Rain Forest beneath us

The floor of the Scenic World Skyway defrosts to reveal the Rain Forest beneath us


Looking back at the Rainforest on the way up to the Top Station on the Scenic World Cableway

Looking back at the Rainforest on the way up to the Top Station on the Scenic World Cableway

On the way back to Sydney we stopped at the Featherdale Wildlife Park, an award winning zoo that opened in 1972 containing the world's largest collection of Australian native animals. Many of them such as Quokkas, Kangaroos, Emus and New Zealand Blue Penguins I had already encountered earlier during my round the world trip.

A pair of Quokkas at Featherdale Wildlife Park

A pair of Quokkas at Featherdale Wildlife Park


An inquisitive Kangaroo at Featherdale Wildlife Park

An inquisitive Kangaroo at Featherdale Wildlife Park


An Emu on the prowl at Featherdale Wildlife Park

An Emu on the prowl at Featherdale Wildlife Park

The Penguin enclosure at Featherdale Wildlife Park

The Penguin enclosure at Featherdale Wildlife Park

However there were plenty of other types of Australian animals at the Wildlife Park I had not yet encountered including the ever adorable Koala, Swamp Wallabies, Dingoes and the Tasmanian Devil (and a lot more besides).

Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park


Swamp Wallabies at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Swamp Wallabies at Featherdale Wildlife Park


Dingoes at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Dingoes at Featherdale Wildlife Park


Tasmanian Devil running around his enclosure at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Tasmanian Devil running around his enclosure at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Of course this time the animals were up close and personal so you were often also able to pet and feed them; although like my previous encounter with one outside Perth I still did not trust the Emu!

Me with a Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Me with a Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park


Me with a friendly Swamp Wallaby at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Me with a friendly Swamp Wallaby at Featherdale Wildlife Park


This Emu was so enthusiastic pecking the food I gave I feared he would get my hand!

This Emu was so enthusiastic pecking the food I gave I feared he would get my hand!

In addition to the native Australian mammals there were also native Australian birds such as Pelicans standing still like statues, brightly coloured Macaws and impressive looking Sea Eagles.

Pelicans at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Pelicans at Featherdale Wildlife Park

A pair of Blue and Yellow Macaws at Featherdale Wildlife Park

A pair of Blue and Yellow Macaws at Featherdale Wildlife Park

White-bellied Sea-eagle eating a fish at Featherdale Wildlife Park

White-bellied Sea-eagle eating a fish at Featherdale Wildlife Park

When we left Featherdale Wildlife Park the Sydney road network was totally gridlocked. To avoid spending the evening stuck in traffic we managed to get on a ferry near the 2000 Olympic Stadium and travelled down the river for a hour and a half to Darling Harbour in the centre of Sydney. As it got dark, the views of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and Darling Harbour all lit up were amazing.

Approaching the Sydney Harbour Bridge on a ferry at night

Approaching the Sydney Harbour Bridge on a ferry at night


Sydney's Darling Harbour at night

Sydney's Darling Harbour at night

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in Australia Tagged waterfalls mountains bridges trees animals sydney boat harbours tour theme_parks mines cablecar rock_formations videos aborigine solo

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