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Independence Hall Philadelphia

America's most historic square mile

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View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

The first city my family took me to visit on the US East Coast was Philadelphia and in particular the L-shaped group of downtown city blocks that make up the Independence National Historic Park and contains many of the key the historical buildings from the time of the American Revolution. Having parked underneath the Independence Visitor Center and made our way past our first Benjamin Franklin look-a-like, I got my first view of Independence Hall ...with a group of Chinese looking people surreally performing Falun Dafa on the lawn out front trying to attract new recruits!

My first view of downtown Philadelphia

My first view of downtown Philadelphia


The Independence Visitor Center and National Constitution Center in Independence Park

The Independence Visitor Center and National Constitution Center in Independence Park


My first view of Independence Hall

My first view of Independence Hall


'Falun Dafa' being performed on the lawn in front of Independence Hall

'Falun Dafa' being performed on the lawn in front of Independence Hall

Our first stop however was to see the famously cracked Liberty Bell which has become an iconic symbol of freedom. The bell was originally made in London and hung in the then State House (now Independence Hall) in 1753 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Pennsylvania's constitution with the inscription from the Bible Leviticus 25:10 "Proclaim Liberty through all the land, to all the inhabitants thereof". The bell was only tolled for important occasions (most notably for the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence in 1776) but became cracked sometime between 1817 and 1846 and after several attempts to repair it hasn't been rung since.

X-rays of the Liberty Bell showing its famous crack

X-rays of the Liberty Bell showing its famous crack


The Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell


Me stood by the Liberty Bell with Independence Hall through the window behind me

Me stood by the Liberty Bell with Independence Hall through the window behind me

The centrepiece of the National Park is Independence Hall itself, a world heritage site and a lovely example of Georgian Quaker architecture. Although free to get in (as are most government owned heritage buildings) we needed timed tickets that had to be booked several days earlier. Our tour began with a talk in the East Wing explaining the historical context (as a Brit I was surprised how the American Revolution was portrayed as something few really wanted and was stumbled into almost as a last resort).

Independence Hall

Independence Hall


Washington's Statue outside Independence Hall

Washington's Statue outside Independence Hall


Plaque commemorating Independence Hall as 'The Birthplace of the United States of America'

Plaque commemorating Independence Hall as 'The Birthplace of the United States of America'


Horse and Carriage passing the front of Independence Hall

Horse and Carriage passing the front of Independence Hall

We were than taken into the main building underneath the white clock tower and shown the Courtroom of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and then the Assembly Room itself (which is where everything happened - George Washington appointed Commander-in-Chief 1775, Declaration of Independence adopted 1776 and a lot more besides).

Courtroom of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court

Courtroom of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court


Independence Hall Assembly Room - where the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776

Independence Hall Assembly Room - where the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1776

Behind Independence Hall is Independence Square which is where first public reading of the Declaration of Independence happened in 1776. In the middle of the square is statue of John Barry, born in Wexford (Ireland) in 1745 he was the first captain of a US warship and is credited with being "The Father of the American Navy" (an epithet sometimes also used for John Paul Jones).

The back of Independence Hall from Independence Square

The back of Independence Hall from Independence Square


Replica of Stretch's 1753 Clock on the west end of Independence Hall

Replica of Stretch's 1753 Clock on the west end of Independence Hall


Commodore Barry's Statue and the back of Independence Hall in Independence Square

Commodore Barry's Statue and the back of Independence Hall in Independence Square

We then hoped to visit Congress Hall on the west side of Independence Square (which is where the US Congress met between 1790 and 1800) but there was quite a long wait until the next tour so I decided to cover this off when I was due to visit Philadelphia again a bit later on my trip. Instead we had a look around the West Wing of Independence Hall which is where original copies of the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution of the United States are on display.

The West Wing of Independence Hall from Independence Square with the Congress Hall just beyond

The West Wing of Independence Hall from Independence Square with the Congress Hall just beyond


Copy of the Declaration of Independence inside the West Wing - no flash allowed!

Copy of the Declaration of Independence inside the West Wing - no flash allowed!


Inkpots used to sign the Declaration of Independence and US Constitution

Inkpots used to sign the Declaration of Independence and US Constitution

The final historic site we passed was Franklin Court which consists of a row of five restored tenement shops, three of which were originally built by Benjamin Franklin in the 1780s. They lead onto a courtyard where Benjamin Franklin's house itself once stood which has an underground museum filled with artifacts associated with him but we didn't have time to go in and see it. Amongst the restored tenement shops is a 18th century printing shop - similar to Franklin's own business, a postal museum and a real US post office - the only one in the country that does not fly the US flag as it didn't yet exist when it first opened in 1775.

Franklin Court Market Street Houses

Franklin Court Market Street Houses


The US Post Office at Franklin Court

The US Post Office at Franklin Court

We then went on an unsuccessful quest to find somewhere I could try the local fast food known as a Philly Cheesesteak before my 2 hour train journey from Trenton into New York to see an exhibition soccer match at the Yankee Stadium. That dubious culinary delight will have to wait for me until another time!

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in USA Tagged museums city chinese philadelphia us_east_coast constitutions

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