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Ayutthaya

Day trip to the Ancient Capital of Thailand

sunny 37 °C
View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

Ayutthaya lies 52 miles (85 kilometres) north of Bangkok and was one of the ancient capitals of Thailand until it was destroyed by the invading Burmese Army in 1767. For over 400 years it prospered and was covered in temples and after its destruction was replaced by Bangkok built on newly exposed land in the Gulf of Siam.

On the way we visited the Royal Palace at Bang Pa-in most of which was built between 1872-1889 and is still used occasionally by the King and Queen of Thailand for hosting state receptions and banquets. The grounds are very ornate and are built in a european style. in the centre of the gardens is the Aisawan-dhipaya-asana Pavilion surrounded by a pond in which we could feed bread to some very energetic turtles and fish! The Royal Palace itself is a two storey manaion built in the Chinese style containing an impressive throne room on the ground floor.

The view up the lake as you enter the grounds of the Bang Pa-in Palace

The view up the lake as you enter the grounds of the Bang Pa-in Palace


Turtles swiming in the pond surrounding the Aisawan-dhipaya-asana Pavilion

Turtles swiming in the pond surrounding the Aisawan-dhipaya-asana Pavilion


Ho withun Thasuna

Ho withun Thasuna


The Phra Thinang (Royal Residence) Wehart Chamrun from the Ho withun Thasuna

The Phra Thinang (Royal Residence) Wehart Chamrun from the Ho withun Thasuna


Me in front of the throne room at the Royal Residence

Me in front of the throne room at the Royal Residence

About an hour's drive later we reached Ayutthaya which is a UNESECO World Heritage Site. In 1700 Ayutthaya ideally situated for trade between India, China and Malaya was the largest city in the world with a population of about 1 million people. The Wat Maha That Temple seemed the most impressive part of the site with its pagoda towering above the ruins and the evocative sandstone buddha mostly buried and overgrown by a tree.

The ruins of Wat Maha That

The ruins of Wat Maha That


The pagoda at Wat Maha That

The pagoda at Wat Maha That


The head of the Sandstone Buddha

The head of the Sandstone Buddha


Buddha amongst the ruins at Wat Maha That

Buddha amongst the ruins at Wat Maha That

We then moved on to Wat Na Phra Mane, the only part of Ayutthaya not destroyed by the invading Burmese Army in 1767 as it was used as their headquarters. The Buddha is unusual in that it is dressed in Royal Attire, as with all Buddhist Temples we hasd to remove our shoes before entering.

The monastery at Wat Na Phra Mane

The monastery at Wat Na Phra Mane


Me by the Buddha in the Temple at Wat Na Phra Mane

Me by the Buddha in the Temple at Wat Na Phra Mane

Our final stop at Ayutthaya before a boat trip back to Bangkok was to the temple at Wat Lokayasutharam which holds one of the largest Reclining Buddha Images (although not as large as the Reclining Buddha at Wat Pho that I saw the previous day).

The Reclining Buddha at Wat Lokayasutharam

The Reclining Buddha at Wat Lokayasutharam


Me by the Reclining Buddha at Wat Lokayasutharam

Me by the Reclining Buddha at Wat Lokayasutharam


Wat Wora Chet the Ram near Wat Lokayasutharam

Wat Wora Chet the Ram near Wat Lokayasutharam

Passing rice paddy fields on the way, we then met up with a cruise boat and had a very tasty Thai Buffet Lunch as we floated down the river back to Bangkok. Amongst the temples and houses on stilts the peppered along the shore we also passed landing craft given to the Thai military by the USA following the Vietnam War and the shed containing the Royal Barges now used only for ceremonial occasions.

Paddy Fields on the way to meet up with the cruise boat back to Bangkok

Paddy Fields on the way to meet up with the cruise boat back to Bangkok


Surplus Landing Craft given to the Thai Military after the Vietnam War

Surplus Landing Craft given to the Thai Military after the Vietnam War


The Royal Barge Sheds by the Phraya River

The Royal Barge Sheds by the Phraya River


A large portrait of the King of Thailand beside th River Phraya

A large portrait of the King of Thailand beside th River Phraya


The Grand Palace Complex from the Phraya River

The Grand Palace Complex from the Phraya River

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in Thailand Tagged temples boat ruins palaces buddha tour solo

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