A Travellerspoint blog

Entries about aborigine

Park, Beach and Roos!

Around Perth quintessentials

semi-overcast 27 °C
View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

One of the things Perth is rightly very proud of is Kings Park, 1,003 acres of park and bush overlooking the city and the vantage point for the quintessential postcard shot of Perth's skyscrapper skyline. Pride of place overlooking the city goes to the WA State War Memorial but there is also an impressive 17 acre gardens including an elevated walkway constructed using lottery funding.

Perth Skyline from Kings Park

Perth Skyline from Kings Park


The State War Memorial in Kings Park overlooking Perth

The State War Memorial in Kings Park overlooking Perth


Me by the WA State War Memorial in Kings Park overlooking Perth

Me by the WA State War Memorial in Kings Park overlooking Perth

Perth, like Sydney likes its beaches along the ocean when it gets hot and the most famous of these is Cottesloe Beach. When we went there it was the first weekend of the annual Sculpture by the Sea outdoor sculpture exhibition that began on Sydney's Bondi Beach back in 1997 and has also been held at Perth's Cottesloe Beach since 2005. Wierd and wonderful modern sculptures were dotted along the beach and its immediate surroundings. I must admit for me I am not sure they all worked but it was a good excuse to have a look around.

Cottesloe Beach

Cottesloe Beach


Sculpture of a lobster on Cottesloe Beach

Sculpture of a lobster on Cottesloe Beach


Skeleton on a ladder by the Pavilion on Cottesloe Beach

Skeleton on a ladder by the Pavilion on Cottesloe Beach


Crocodile sculpture on Cottesloe Beach

Crocodile sculpture on Cottesloe Beach


Admiring a sculpture hanging between the trees with the poles of the Bali Bombing Memorial on the beach in the background

Admiring a sculpture hanging between the trees with the poles of the Bali Bombing Memorial on the beach in the background

However one thing I definately wanted to see while in Perth was a wild kangaroo; not as easy as it sounds and as we drove up to Mundaring Weir in the Perth Hills 24 miles outside of Perth there was no guarantee we would succeed. At first all we saw was a couple of kangaroos foraging in someone's front garden but they soon disappeared before we could get a decent photo, it looked like I was going to leave Perth empty handed. Then, just like the quokkas on Rottnest Island we were surrounded by a mob of about a dozen kangaroos just as we were about to give up! We celebrated with a drink afterwards at the local pub.

A couple of Kangaroos foraging in a front garden

A couple of Kangaroos foraging in a front garden


Kangaroos foraging in the Forest

Kangaroos foraging in the Forest


Me with a couple wild kangaroos behind me

Me with a couple wild kangaroos behind me


One final photo of a wild kangaroo

One final photo of a wild kangaroo

Mundaring Weir Hotel

Mundaring Weir Hotel

Having been lucky with the quokka on Rottnest Island and the kangaroos at Mundaring Weir I thought we would also tick off the camel ride I missed in Oman with a visit to Camel Farm at Calamunda.

Few people realise it but there are actually more camels in Australia than Egypt and Saudi Arabia combined! Camels were brought to Australia as pack animals in the 19th Century and when with the advent of trucks and trains they were no longer needed they were set free and thrived! Being bred as pack animals rather than for racing as happens in the Middle East they also tend to be larger than their Arab cousins. Anyhow after a short trek through the forest on the back of a camel called Wasim I had another tick in the box.

Me on a camel trekking through the Perth Hills

Me on a camel trekking through the Perth Hills


Camels waiting their turn at Calamunda

Camels waiting their turn at Calamunda


Nearby there was also an Emu in an enclosure but he looked grumpy so we did not get too close!

Nearby there was also an Emu in an enclosure but he looked grumpy so we did not get too close!

Posted by FrancisRTW 19:00 Archived in Australia Tagged beaches animals beer perth videos aborigine war_memorials Comments (0)

A day in Freo

Visit to a Martime Museum with a submarine, historic prisons and a brewery

overcast 20 °C
View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

Fremantle Port (affectionately known as "'Freo" to the locals) sits at the mouth of the Swan River about 25 minutes west of Perth. It has retained its old buildings and charm and apart from the Port Authority Building itself doesn't have the skyscrapers found in Perth. A lot of migrants arrived from Europe through Fremantle including my cousins from Ireland and there are several statues of migrants around the port area. Fremantle is also home to the eye catching West Australian Maritime Museum opened in 2002 with the old museum now used as a Shipwreck Gallery. Amongst the new museum's displays is the Australia II which was the first non-American yacht to win the Americas Cup and brought the competition to Fremantle in 1987.

Fremantle Port Authority Building and the Leeuwin II Sail Training Ship

Fremantle Port Authority Building and the Leeuwin II Sail Training Ship


Migrant Statue near the Fremantle E-Sheds

Migrant Statue near the Fremantle E-Sheds


The West Australian Maritime Museum in Fremantle

The West Australian Maritime Museum in Fremantle


Sama Biasa - an Indonesian Fishing Boat confiscated for fishing in Australian waters

Sama Biasa - an Indonesian Fishing Boat confiscated for fishing in Australian waters


The 1983 Americas Cup winning yacht Australia II

The 1983 Americas Cup winning yacht Australia II

On a slipway alongside the museum there is the Oberon class submarine HMAS Ovens. It was originally commissioned in 1969 and was operational for 26 years before being handed over as a museum ship. It was a fascinating tour and left with the impression that if needed she was maintained in such good condition that she could be put to sea again.

HMAS Ovens

HMAS Ovens


Forward Torpedo Room within HMAS Ovens

Forward Torpedo Room within HMAS Ovens


Looking up inside the Coning Tower within HMAS Ovens

Looking up inside the Coning Tower within HMAS Ovens


HMAS Ovens Engine Room

HMAS Ovens Engine Room

A couple of minutes along the sea front is an odd 12 sided stone prison called the Round House, built in 1830-31 and the oldest surviving building in Western Australia. It where the first hangings in WA took place and was also used for holding aborigines before they were taken to Rottnest. In front of the Round House there is a signal canon once used for ships in the harbour to set their time and still fired daily at 1pm and underneath there is the Whalers Tunnel carved through the sandstone and used to access the beach where whales were once landed and processed.

The Round House in Fremantle

The Round House in Fremantle


The courtyard within the Round House

The courtyard within the Round House


Me by the 1pm Signal Gun near the Round House

Me by the 1pm Signal Gun near the Round House


The Round House and Whalers' Tunnel

The Round House and Whalers' Tunnel

Away from the coast is Freo's biggest tourist attraction and Western Australia's only World Heritage Site - Freemantle Prison. Built in the 1850s based on Pentonville Prison in London, it was in use right up until 1991 when a prison riot and fire exposed how out-dated it was (modern fire appliances couldn't get in the main gate).

Fremantle Prison Main Block

Fremantle Prison Main Block


Inside one of the division wings at Fremantle Prison

Inside one of the division wings at Fremantle Prison


Exercise Yard at Fremantle Prison

Exercise Yard at Fremantle Prison

As we were guided through the different parts of the prison - the different prison wings ("divisions"), exercise yards, solitary confinement block and the hanging room and the associated prison stories and superstitions - it felt like being on the location of a film set and I kept thinking of Shawshanks Redemption.

The Chapel at Fremantle Prison - note the 6th commandment reads "Thou shalt do no murder" rather than the more usual "Thou shalt not kill"

The Chapel at Fremantle Prison - note the 6th commandment reads "Thou shalt do no murder" rather than the more usual "Thou shalt not kill"


Prison superstition - 6 and 16 missing from a wall because they look like a hangman's noose

Prison superstition - 6 and 16 missing from a wall because they look like a hangman's noose


The Hanging Room at Fremantle Prison

The Hanging Room at Fremantle Prison


I escaped! Me outside Fremantle Prison Main Gate

I escaped! Me outside Fremantle Prison Main Gate

Our final stop in Freo was the Little Creatures Micro Brewery on the Esplanade. The beer tasted great and I could happily have spent hours getting quite merry on it but we needed to get back to Perth.

The Little Creatures Micro Brewery in Freo

The Little Creatures Micro Brewery in Freo


The bar inside the Little Creatures Micro Brewery

The bar inside the Little Creatures Micro Brewery

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in Australia Tagged churches museums beer harbours perth submarines prisons aborigine breweries warships americas_cup Comments (0)

Day Trip to the Blue Mountains

Visiting the Three Sisters, Scenic World and the Featherdale Wildlife Park

semi-overcast 19 °C
View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

The one place outside the city that seems to be on everyone's bucket list when they visit Sydney is the stunning Three Sisters sandstone rock formation in the Blue Mountains about 40 miles (60 kilometres) inland at Katoomba on the Great Western Highway.

The Three Sisters Rock Formation in the Blue Mountains

The Three Sisters Rock Formation in the Blue Mountains


Me by the Three Sisters Rock Formation at the Echo Point Lookout

Me by the Three Sisters Rock Formation at the Echo Point Lookout


The Jamison Valley and Blue Mountains

The Jamison Valley and Blue Mountains

According to legend (and immortalised by statues outside neighbouring Scenic World) the three rocks are three sisters from the local Katoomba Tribe who were turned to stone by their tribe's sorcerer to protect them from the unwanted advances of three young men from a neighbouring tribe but that the sorcerer himself was killed in battle before he could turn them back to life again.

Statues of the Sorcerer and the Three Sisters outside Scenic World

Statues of the Sorcerer and the Three Sisters outside Scenic World


Me beside the statue of the Sorcerer outside Scenic World

Me beside the statue of the Sorcerer outside Scenic World

Scenic World itself began life as a coal mine in the 1880s. In 1928 a funicular railway was built to transport miners down the Jamison Valley side to the mine in the rainforest below which turned out to be the steepest passenger railway in the world (52 degrees contained within a total incline distance of 1,316 feet - 415 metres). When the mine closed in 1945 the funicular railway remained as a tourist attraction which became the Scenic World Railway we see today.

The Scenic World Railway about to leave its Top Station for the Rainforest floor

The Scenic World Railway about to leave its Top Station for the Rainforest floor


On our way down to the Rainforest floor aboard the Scenic World Railway

On our way down to the Rainforest floor aboard the Scenic World Railway

Coal Mine entrance on the rainforest floor at Scenic World

Coal Mine entrance on the rainforest floor at Scenic World


The walkway through the Rainforest on the valley floor at Scenic World

The walkway through the Rainforest on the valley floor at Scenic World

Since then the railway has been upgraded (including quite recently in early 2013) and the Scenic Skyway across the valley and Scenic Cableway back up from the rainforest floor added. The Skyway passes across the Katoomba Falls and includes a glass floor that defrosts as you set of so you can look down on the tree tops of the rainforest below.

The Scenic World Skyway making its way across the Rain Forest

The Scenic World Skyway making its way across the Rain Forest


The Katoomba Falls from the Scenic World Skyway

The Katoomba Falls from the Scenic World Skyway


The floor of the Scenic World Skyway defrosts to reveal the Rain Forest beneath us

The floor of the Scenic World Skyway defrosts to reveal the Rain Forest beneath us


Looking back at the Rainforest on the way up to the Top Station on the Scenic World Cableway

Looking back at the Rainforest on the way up to the Top Station on the Scenic World Cableway

On the way back to Sydney we stopped at the Featherdale Wildlife Park, an award winning zoo that opened in 1972 containing the world's largest collection of Australian native animals. Many of them such as Quokkas, Kangaroos, Emus and New Zealand Blue Penguins I had already encountered earlier during my round the world trip.

A pair of Quokkas at Featherdale Wildlife Park

A pair of Quokkas at Featherdale Wildlife Park


An inquisitive Kangaroo at Featherdale Wildlife Park

An inquisitive Kangaroo at Featherdale Wildlife Park


An Emu on the prowl at Featherdale Wildlife Park

An Emu on the prowl at Featherdale Wildlife Park

The Penguin enclosure at Featherdale Wildlife Park

The Penguin enclosure at Featherdale Wildlife Park

However there were plenty of other types of Australian animals at the Wildlife Park I had not yet encountered including the ever adorable Koala, Swamp Wallabies, Dingoes and the Tasmanian Devil (and a lot more besides).

Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park


Swamp Wallabies at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Swamp Wallabies at Featherdale Wildlife Park


Dingoes at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Dingoes at Featherdale Wildlife Park


Tasmanian Devil running around his enclosure at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Tasmanian Devil running around his enclosure at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Of course this time the animals were up close and personal so you were often also able to pet and feed them; although like my previous encounter with one outside Perth I still did not trust the Emu!

Me with a Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Me with a Koala at Featherdale Wildlife Park


Me with a friendly Swamp Wallaby at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Me with a friendly Swamp Wallaby at Featherdale Wildlife Park


This Emu was so enthusiastic pecking the food I gave I feared he would get my hand!

This Emu was so enthusiastic pecking the food I gave I feared he would get my hand!

In addition to the native Australian mammals there were also native Australian birds such as Pelicans standing still like statues, brightly coloured Macaws and impressive looking Sea Eagles.

Pelicans at Featherdale Wildlife Park

Pelicans at Featherdale Wildlife Park

A pair of Blue and Yellow Macaws at Featherdale Wildlife Park

A pair of Blue and Yellow Macaws at Featherdale Wildlife Park

White-bellied Sea-eagle eating a fish at Featherdale Wildlife Park

White-bellied Sea-eagle eating a fish at Featherdale Wildlife Park

When we left Featherdale Wildlife Park the Sydney road network was totally gridlocked. To avoid spending the evening stuck in traffic we managed to get on a ferry near the 2000 Olympic Stadium and travelled down the river for a hour and a half to Darling Harbour in the centre of Sydney. As it got dark, the views of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and Darling Harbour all lit up were amazing.

Approaching the Sydney Harbour Bridge on a ferry at night

Approaching the Sydney Harbour Bridge on a ferry at night


Sydney's Darling Harbour at night

Sydney's Darling Harbour at night

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in Australia Tagged waterfalls mountains bridges trees animals sydney boat harbours tour theme_parks mines cablecar rock_formations videos aborigine solo Comments (0)

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