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Entries about submarines

A day in Freo

Visit to a Martime Museum with a submarine, historic prisons and a brewery

overcast 20 °C
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Fremantle Port (affectionately known as "'Freo" to the locals) sits at the mouth of the Swan River about 25 minutes west of Perth. It has retained its old buildings and charm and apart from the Port Authority Building itself doesn't have the skyscrapers found in Perth. A lot of migrants arrived from Europe through Fremantle including my cousins from Ireland and there are several statues of migrants around the port area. Fremantle is also home to the eye catching West Australian Maritime Museum opened in 2002 with the old museum now used as a Shipwreck Gallery. Amongst the new museum's displays is the Australia II which was the first non-American yacht to win the Americas Cup and brought the competition to Fremantle in 1987.

Fremantle Port Authority Building and the Leeuwin II Sail Training Ship

Fremantle Port Authority Building and the Leeuwin II Sail Training Ship


Migrant Statue near the Fremantle E-Sheds

Migrant Statue near the Fremantle E-Sheds


The West Australian Maritime Museum in Fremantle

The West Australian Maritime Museum in Fremantle


Sama Biasa - an Indonesian Fishing Boat confiscated for fishing in Australian waters

Sama Biasa - an Indonesian Fishing Boat confiscated for fishing in Australian waters


The 1983 Americas Cup winning yacht Australia II

The 1983 Americas Cup winning yacht Australia II

On a slipway alongside the museum there is the Oberon class submarine HMAS Ovens. It was originally commissioned in 1969 and was operational for 26 years before being handed over as a museum ship. It was a fascinating tour and left with the impression that if needed she was maintained in such good condition that she could be put to sea again.

HMAS Ovens

HMAS Ovens


Forward Torpedo Room within HMAS Ovens

Forward Torpedo Room within HMAS Ovens


Looking up inside the Coning Tower within HMAS Ovens

Looking up inside the Coning Tower within HMAS Ovens


HMAS Ovens Engine Room

HMAS Ovens Engine Room

A couple of minutes along the sea front is an odd 12 sided stone prison called the Round House, built in 1830-31 and the oldest surviving building in Western Australia. It where the first hangings in WA took place and was also used for holding aborigines before they were taken to Rottnest. In front of the Round House there is a signal canon once used for ships in the harbour to set their time and still fired daily at 1pm and underneath there is the Whalers Tunnel carved through the sandstone and used to access the beach where whales were once landed and processed.

The Round House in Fremantle

The Round House in Fremantle


The courtyard within the Round House

The courtyard within the Round House


Me by the 1pm Signal Gun near the Round House

Me by the 1pm Signal Gun near the Round House


The Round House and Whalers' Tunnel

The Round House and Whalers' Tunnel

Away from the coast is Freo's biggest tourist attraction and Western Australia's only World Heritage Site - Freemantle Prison. Built in the 1850s based on Pentonville Prison in London, it was in use right up until 1991 when a prison riot and fire exposed how out-dated it was (modern fire appliances couldn't get in the main gate).

Fremantle Prison Main Block

Fremantle Prison Main Block


Inside one of the division wings at Fremantle Prison

Inside one of the division wings at Fremantle Prison


Exercise Yard at Fremantle Prison

Exercise Yard at Fremantle Prison

As we were guided through the different parts of the prison - the different prison wings ("divisions"), exercise yards, solitary confinement block and the hanging room and the associated prison stories and superstitions - it felt like being on the location of a film set and I kept thinking of Shawshanks Redemption.

The Chapel at Fremantle Prison - note the 6th commandment reads "Thou shalt do no murder" rather than the more usual "Thou shalt not kill"

The Chapel at Fremantle Prison - note the 6th commandment reads "Thou shalt do no murder" rather than the more usual "Thou shalt not kill"


Prison superstition - 6 and 16 missing from a wall because they look like a hangman's noose

Prison superstition - 6 and 16 missing from a wall because they look like a hangman's noose


The Hanging Room at Fremantle Prison

The Hanging Room at Fremantle Prison


I escaped! Me outside Fremantle Prison Main Gate

I escaped! Me outside Fremantle Prison Main Gate

Our final stop in Freo was the Little Creatures Micro Brewery on the Esplanade. The beer tasted great and I could happily have spent hours getting quite merry on it but we needed to get back to Perth.

The Little Creatures Micro Brewery in Freo

The Little Creatures Micro Brewery in Freo


The bar inside the Little Creatures Micro Brewery

The bar inside the Little Creatures Micro Brewery

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in Australia Tagged churches museums beer harbours perth submarines prisons aborigine breweries warships americas_cup Comments (0)

The RMS Queen Mary

Visiting an elegant Queen and warships at Long Beach

semi-overcast 22 °C
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Although I have been to Los Angeles three times previously visiting family I have never been to Long Beach and was keen to see the retired 1936 art deco ocean liner RMS Queen Mary that is permanently docked there. Alongside her is the Soviet Foxtrot Class b-427 Scorpion Submarine purchased from the Russians in the 1990s and also the large dome that was once used to display the Hughes H-4 Hercules "Spruce Goose" before it was sold in 1998 to the Evergreen Aviation Museum in Oregon. The Spruce Goose only flew once in 1947 (for a distance of about a mile about 70 feet above the water) and is the largest flying boat ever built with the longest wingspan of any aircraft in history.

The RMS Queen Mary berthed up at Long Beach

The RMS Queen Mary berthed up at Long Beach


The RMS Queen Mary and Soviet b-427 'Scorpion' Submarine at Long Beach

The RMS Queen Mary and Soviet b-427 'Scorpion' Submarine at Long Beach


The now empty display dome for the 'Spruce Goose' Flying Boat alongside the RMS Queen Mary

The now empty display dome for the 'Spruce Goose' Flying Boat alongside the RMS Queen Mary

We began our tour however with a visit aboard the Cold War vintage Soviet Foxtrot Class b-427 Scorpion Submarine that floats alongside the RMS Queen Mary. Launched in Leningrad in 1972 she was part of the Soviet Pacific Submarine Fleet based out of Vladivostok and was one of 79 Foxtrot Class submarines that served with the Soviet Navy before being decommissioned in 1994. She is a contemporary of the Australian Submarine HMAS Ovens I looked around in Freemantle and it was strange to think of them on opposing sides and hunting each other.

The Soviet b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside the RMS Queen Mary at Long Beach

The Soviet b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside the RMS Queen Mary at Long Beach


The Forward Torpedo Room aboard the Soviet b-427 Scorpion

The Forward Torpedo Room aboard the Soviet b-427 Scorpion


Close up of the forward torpedo tubes aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Close up of the forward torpedo tubes aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Sonar Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Sonar Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Although the Soviet submarine in the film is a nuclear attack submarine and a lot bigger, walking past the officer's ward room and then climbing through the Control Room to look through the Attack Periscope with all the Russian writing everywhere I couldn't help thinking of Sean Connery in the 1990 film "The Hunt for Red October"!

Officer's Ward Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Officer's Ward Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Hatch into the Control Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Hatch into the Control Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Me looking through the attack periscope aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Me looking through the attack periscope aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Assorted knobs at the rear of the Control Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Assorted knobs at the rear of the Control Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

The b-427 Scorpion had a crew of 56 sailors, 10 midshipman and 12 officers and felt a lot more cramped than the HMAS Ovens. Since arriving in Long Beach with Hollywood not too far away she has appeared as a Russian, American, German and even a Japanese submarine in many films, TV shows, commercials and documentaries.

The Galley aboard the b-427 Scorpion

The Galley aboard the b-427 Scorpion


The Engine Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

The Engine Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Crew bunks in the Rear Torpedo Room of the b-427 Scorpion

Crew bunks in the Rear Torpedo Room of the b-427 Scorpion

We then moved on to the main event, the RMS Queen Mary. Legend has it that she was originally going to be called the Queen Victoria but when as per protocol Cunard approached King George V for his blessing for the ship's proposed name saying, "We have decided to name our new ship after England's greatest Queen," (meaning Queen Victoria, the King's Grandmother) the King reportedly replied "My wife (Queen Mary) will be delighted that you are naming the ship after her" and so she was called the Queen Mary instead.

The view boarding the Queen Mary at Long Beach

The view boarding the Queen Mary at Long Beach


The outside Promenade Deck on the Queen Mary

The outside Promenade Deck on the Queen Mary


The Ship's Bell on the Queen Mary

The Ship's Bell on the Queen Mary


Marble Plaque and portrait of Queen Mary over the Main Staircase on the Promenade Deck

Marble Plaque and portrait of Queen Mary over the Main Staircase on the Promenade Deck

Our guide for the main "Glory Days" tour of the ship was a retired Captain who was extremely knowledgeable about the ship. The Queen Mary was built in Clydebank (Scotland) and when launched in 1936 set a new benchmark in transatlantic travel and was considered by the rich and famous as the only way to travel. On our tour (with exception of the First Class Lounge or "Queens Salon" which was closed for a private function) we were shown around all the main rooms of the ship with their luxurious art-deco furnishings.

The First Class Restaurant aboard the Queen Mary (also known as the Grand Salon)

The First Class Restaurant aboard the Queen Mary (also known as the Grand Salon)


Ornate map on the back wall of the First Class Restaurant used to show the location of the Queen Mary while crossing the Atlantic

Ornate map on the back wall of the First Class Restaurant used to show the location of the Queen Mary while crossing the Atlantic


The Observation Bar on the forward Promenade Deck

The Observation Bar on the forward Promenade Deck

Queen Mary herself appears to have only briefly visited the ship once but she proved popular with Hollywood stars such as Bob Hope and was frequently used by British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to cross the Atlantic during WWII. The Queen Mary Hotel currently features 314 of the original guest rooms including 305 staterooms and 9 full suites. Interestingly the bathroom of the suite used by Queen Mary we looked around had 4 taps - separate sets of hot and cold taps for fresh and salt water.

The Royal Suite's Bedroom aboard the Queen Mary

The Royal Suite's Bedroom aboard the Queen Mary


The Royal Suite's Day Room aboard the Queen Mary

The Royal Suite's Day Room aboard the Queen Mary


Bathroom in the Queen Mary's Royal Suite - note the 2 sets of hot and cold taps for fresh and salt water

Bathroom in the Queen Mary's Royal Suite - note the 2 sets of hot and cold taps for fresh and salt water


First class corridor stretching the length of the ship

First class corridor stretching the length of the ship

The Queen Mary also had a Travel Bureau (recently restored) for first class passengers to make hotel reservations before their arrival at their final destinations. There was also an indoor swimming pool with an art deco entrance; when we were taken inside it was very dark as these days it is used mainly on the Queen Mary's Ghost & Legends Tour which can only be described as "corny" as they try to scare people in true ghost train fashion with stories of calamities aboard the ship such as the stoker who was tragically chopped in half by a bulkhead door. The biggest disaster to befell the Queen Mary was her collision with and sinking of the British cruiser HMS Curacao off the coast of Ireland in 1942 when 331 lives were lost. This is remembered on the Ghost & Legends Tour with a recreation of flooding in the side of ship down in one of the engine rooms.

The Travel Bureau on Main Deck

The Travel Bureau on Main Deck


The art-deco entrance to the First Class Swimming Pool

The art-deco entrance to the First Class Swimming Pool


The darkened First Class Swimming Pool aboard the Queen Mary

The darkened First Class Swimming Pool aboard the Queen Mary


Simulated water flooding in the side of ship down in one of the Engine Rooms during the 'Ghost and Legends Tour'

Simulated water flooding in the side of ship down in one of the Engine Rooms during the 'Ghost and Legends Tour'

The Bridge of the ship was spacious with polished wheels and levers and had a view forward up the Los Angeles River with the b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside. Included on the deck is a Bofors Gun as used to defend the ship during WWII.

The Bridge aboard the Queen Mary

The Bridge aboard the Queen Mary


The view forward from the Bridge with the b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside

The view forward from the Bridge with the b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside


Me on the Forward Deck of the Queen Mary

Me on the Forward Deck of the Queen Mary


WWII Bofors Gun on the deck of the Queen Mary

WWII Bofors Gun on the deck of the Queen Mary

Towards the back of the ship with a separate walkway is the "Queen Mary Story" Museum which included various models and memorabilia from the ship as well as mock ups of different types of cabins used during her history. There is also access through the museum to one of the Queen Mary's engine rooms and a propeller submerged in a tank of water to preserve it.

View back along the Queen Mary portside from outside the Bridge

View back along the Queen Mary portside from outside the Bridge


Inside an Engine Room aboard the Queen Mary

Inside an Engine Room aboard the Queen Mary


One of the Queen Mary's Propellers

One of the Queen Mary's Propellers

One of the most interesting periods in the Queen Mary's history is her involvement in WWII. The ship was called up as a troopship and affectionately known as the "Grey Ghost" for the drab shade of grey she was painted and ability to evade U-boats because of her speed. Eventually during the course of the war the Queen Mary carried more than 800,000 troops (including 16,683 on a single voyage - a record that remains to this day) and travelled more than 600,000 miles playing a significant role in virtually every major Allied campaign. Winston Churchill credited the Queen Mary with shortening the War by a year and amongst the exhibits were GI bunk beds, a gym and weaponry used during this period. After the war the Queen Mary spent the following year repatriating American troops and GI brides before finally being demobbed and returned to Cunard her owners in September 1946.

Ship Plan and Bunks as used during WWII

Ship Plan and Bunks as used during WWII


Example of the extra weaponry mounted aboard to protect the Queen Mary during WWII

Example of the extra weaponry mounted aboard to protect the Queen Mary during WWII


Gym as used by American Soldiers aboard the Queen Mary during WWII

Gym as used by American Soldiers aboard the Queen Mary during WWII


Example of a cabin used by GI Brides after WWII

Example of a cabin used by GI Brides after WWII

When the Queen Mary was put up for sale in 1967 she was purchased by the City of Long Beach to become a signature tourist attraction and high class hotel which she continues to be today. In addition to the Queen Mary Glory Days and Ghosts & Legends Tours that we signed up for there was also a Her Finest Hour: A WWII Tour and Diana: Legacy of a Princess Exhibition containing a collection of her evening gowns, dresses and other memorabilia but that was more than we could take!

Hotel Reception on 'A' Deck of the Queen Mary

Hotel Reception on 'A' Deck of the Queen Mary


Queen Elisabeth and Prince Phillip's portraits on the wall of the lobby on 'A' Deck

Queen Elisabeth and Prince Phillip's portraits on the wall of the lobby on 'A' Deck


Shops on the Promenade Deck aboard the Queen Mary

Shops on the Promenade Deck aboard the Queen Mary


Entrance to the 'Diana: Legacy of a Princess' Exhibition aboard the Queen Mary

Entrance to the 'Diana: Legacy of a Princess' Exhibition aboard the Queen Mary

As you can probably judge by the number of photographs in this entry, by the time we finished at the Queen Mary there was little time left to explore the rest of Long Beach! We did however manage to walk along the waterfront at San Pedro watching the container ships entering and leaving Los Angeles Harbor, the busiest container port in the USA and also took some photographs of the WWII Battleship USS Iowa that was berthed there. The USS Iowa closed as we got there, I guess I'll have to see if I can do a tour of one of her sister ships on the East Coast instead!

Container Ships entering and leaving Los Angeles Harbor under the Vincent Thomas Bridge (the USS Iowa can be seen on the left)

Container Ships entering and leaving Los Angeles Harbor under the Vincent Thomas Bridge (the USS Iowa can be seen on the left)


USS Iowa at San Pedro

USS Iowa at San Pedro


USS Iowa (BB-61) at San Pedro

USS Iowa (BB-61) at San Pedro

On the dock side by the bow of the USS Iowa was a 6 foot copy of Seward Johnson's iconic "Sailor kissing a Nurse" (aka "Unconditional Surrender") sculpture that seems popular alongside US Museum Ships (the original statute was 25 foot high and was based on photograph taken in Times Square New York on V-J Day 1945).

A copy of the iconic 'Sailor kissing a Nurse' statue beside the USS Iowa

A copy of the iconic 'Sailor kissing a Nurse' statue beside the USS Iowa

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in USA Tagged museums hotels boat california cruise_ships harbours submarines warships film_locations Comments (0)

Last stop in Philly

The last couple of days of my trip around the world

rain 28 °C
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My final full day on my trip around the world had arrived :(. It was tempting to have a day of rest but instead I decided to get the train to Philadelphia to finally visit the US Mint. It was my third attempt (!) as it had been closed last time I had been in town and I had been unable to book a tour of the mint's facility in Denver.

The US Mint in Philadelphia was established in 1792 and describes itself as "the largest coin factory in the world". Inside there was a small museum on the mezzanine before a self-guided tour above the vast shop floor where I saw machines blank, anneal and strike strips of copper and nickel turning them into coins. Unfortunately as with the Federal Bureau of Printing and Engraving I saw in Washington (who are responsible for printing US bank notes) photography was not allowed inside the Mint itself for security reasons.

The United States Mint in Philadelphia

The United States Mint in Philadelphia

My next stop was the National Constitution Center, a state-of-the-art museum devoted to the US Constitution and about the only place left I hadn't visited in Independence Park in downtown Philadelphia after my previous two visits. The tour started with a 17 minute multi-media theatre-in-the-round show called "Freedom Rising" before moving on to a ring of interactive exhibits explaining different facets of it and its history. Unfortunately photography was again forbidden apart from for the final exhibit called Signers' Hall which contained 42 bronze statues of the original signatories of the Constitution - the seated statue of Benjamin Franklin stole the show!

The National Constitution Center in Independence Park Philadelphia

The National Constitution Center in Independence Park Philadelphia


The Signers' Hall inside the National Constitution Center

The Signers' Hall inside the National Constitution Center


Benjamin Franklin's statue in Signers' Hall

Benjamin Franklin's statue in Signers' Hall


George Washington's statue standing behind the table in the Signers' Hall

George Washington's statue standing behind the table in the Signers' Hall

It was now time to brave the rather wet weather and make my way down to Penn's Landing on the River Delaware waterfront which is where Philadelphia's founder William Penn originally docked in 1682. Today it's a pretty bland area of concrete and car parks cut off from the city by the I-95 Freeway but it did include Philadelphia's Irish Memorial, a 30 foot long bronze opened to the public in 2003 to mark the 150th anniversary of the Irish Famine. The Scottish Immigrant Memorial was unveiled close by in 2011.

A rainy day at the Penn's Landing Viaduct

A rainy day at the Penn's Landing Viaduct


The Irish Famine Memorial at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia

The Irish Famine Memorial at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia


The Scottish Memorial at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia

The Scottish Memorial at Penn's Landing in Philadelphia


The Christopher Columbus Memorial at Penn's Landing

The Christopher Columbus Memorial at Penn's Landing

However what I really wanted to see at Penn's Landing was the historic ships at the Independence Seaport Museum. First up was the USS Becuna, an American World War II Balao-class submarine original built in 1944. She did 5 combat patrols before the end of the war during which she sank 2 Japanese tankers before being serving in the Atlantic during the Cold War and eventually being decommissioned in 1969.

The USS Becuna at the Independence Seaport Museum

The USS Becuna at the Independence Seaport Museum


The Forward Torpedo Room aboard the USS Becuna

The Forward Torpedo Room aboard the USS Becuna


The Ward Room aboard the USS Becuna

The Ward Room aboard the USS Becuna

In total there were 122 Balao-class submarines built, the largest class of submarines ever built for the US Navy. The USS Becuna is one of 8 Balao-class submarines distributed around the USA as museum ships and the third submarine I had been aboard during my trip; the others were the HMAS Ovens in Freemantle, Western Australia and the Soviet b-427 'Scorpion' in Long Beach, California, both of which were of Cold War vintage.

The Control Room aboard USS Becuna

The Control Room aboard USS Becuna


The Crew's Mess aboard the USS Becuna

The Crew's Mess aboard the USS Becuna


The Crew's Quarters aboard the USS Becuna

The Crew's Quarters aboard the USS Becuna


The Engine Room aboard the USS Becuna

The Engine Room aboard the USS Becuna

However pride of place at the Independence Seaport Museum goes to the USS Olympia which I could see across the River Delaware when I visited the USS New Jersey in Camden a fortnight before. Built in San Francisco and launched in 1892, the USS Olympia was famously Commodore George Dewey's flagship at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish American War of 1892 and is the oldest steel US warship still afloat.

The USS Becuna and USS Olympia at the Independence Seaport Museum

The USS Becuna and USS Olympia at the Independence Seaport Museum


The forward deck and 8 inch gun turret of the USS Olympia

The forward deck and 8 inch gun turret of the USS Olympia


The view of the USS New Jersey from the bridge of the USS Olympia

The view of the USS New Jersey from the bridge of the USS Olympia

The USS Olympia is painted in the US Navy's catchy pre-dreadnought peacetime colour scheme of a white hull with ochre superstructure. As a result of their colour scheme the US fleet of the time was often referred to as the 'Great White Fleet'; during wartime US warships were re-painted medium sea grey. The late 19th century was a time of rapid evolution in warship design and the small wooden wheelhouse with the majority of the guns being in casements below deck rather than rotating turrets above deck feels very antiquated when compared with only slightly later warships.

Inside the USS Olympia's Wheelhouse

Inside the USS Olympia's Wheelhouse


The USS Olympia's ship's bell

The USS Olympia's ship's bell


5 inch gun mounted in a casemate below deck

5 inch gun mounted in a casemate below deck


6-pounder (57 mm (2.24 in)) anti-torpedo-boat gun in a casement below deck

6-pounder (57 mm (2.24 in)) anti-torpedo-boat gun in a casement below deck

Below deck the USS Olympia was equally dated with the rear of the ship consisting of a wooden panelled central salon surrounded by 16 staterooms and ward room collectively known as 'Officer's Country'. Rank and file crew members slept in hammocks slung up amongst the working areas at the front of the ship with the big copper cooking pots used for cooking in the galley echoing a bygone age.

The Officer's Berth Deck - known as 'Officer's Country' - aboard the USS Olympia

The Officer's Berth Deck - known as 'Officer's Country' - aboard the USS Olympia


The Ward Room aboard the USS Olympia

The Ward Room aboard the USS Olympia


Crew hammocks below deck

Crew hammocks below deck


The galley aboard the USS Olympia where they did all the cooking

The galley aboard the USS Olympia where they did all the cooking

Docked in front of the USS Olympia is the Moshulu, a four-masted steel barque built on the River Clyde in Scotland in 1904. It's not part of the Independence Seaport Museum and is currently used as a floating restaurant.

The Moshulu moored up at Penn's Landing in front of the USS Olympia

The Moshulu moored up at Penn's Landing in front of the USS Olympia

Close by is Welcome Park, a concrete plaza opened in 1982 on the 300th anniversary of the founding of Pennsylvania by William Penn. The park sits on the site of William Penn's house between 1699-1701 and is named after the ship that brought him to America. In the centre of the plaza is a bronze scale model of his statue on top of Philadelphia's impressive Town Hall.

William Penn's Statue in Philadelphia's Welcome Park

William Penn's Statue in Philadelphia's Welcome Park


Close up of William Penn's Statue in Welcome Park

Close up of William Penn's Statue in Welcome Park

It was now time to catch the train back from Philadelphia's 30th Street Station. However this time instead of waiting in the impressive central waiting room used for AMTRAK trains (such as the one I caught to Washington the week before) I was catching the local SEPTA train to Trenton.

The waiting room at Philadelphia's 30th Street Station

The waiting room at Philadelphia's 30th Street Station


The 'Angel of the Resurrection' statue on the Pennsylvania Railroad World War II Memorial at Philadelphia's 30th Street Station

The 'Angel of the Resurrection' statue on the Pennsylvania Railroad World War II Memorial at Philadelphia's 30th Street Station


SEPTA Train in Philadelphia's 30th Street Station

SEPTA Train in Philadelphia's 30th Street Station

Back in Trenton we had time for one last excursion to Princeton to look around its famous university. Princeton University was founded in 1746 and is one of the eight members of the renowned 'Ivy League' along with Harvard and Yale. Although not as old, strolling amongst the old buildings on the campus reminded me of walking around the colleges of Oxford University back home. The centrepiece and oldest building on the campus is Nassau Hall built in 1756 which was briefly used by the US Congress and therefore served as the country's capitol for 4 months in 1783. Further buildings such as Chancellor Green and East Pyne Hall were added from the early 1800s.

Nassau Hall, the oldest building at Princeton University (built 1756)

Nassau Hall, the oldest building at Princeton University (built 1756)


The Chancellor Green Rotunda and East Pyne Hall at Princeton University

The Chancellor Green Rotunda and East Pyne Hall at Princeton University


The central court of East Pyne Hall at Princeton University

The central court of East Pyne Hall at Princeton University


The Whig and Clio Halls along Chapel Drive at Princeton University

The Whig and Clio Halls along Chapel Drive at Princeton University

The following day we visited Princeton again on the way to the airport for my final flight home hoping to get some more photographs but the campus was closed off because of a bomb scare!

My last view of New York from Newark International Airport before my flight back to London

My last view of New York from Newark International Airport before my flight back to London

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in USA Tagged trains museums philadelphia submarines universities solo irish_famine warships mints us_east_coast constitutions external_links Comments (0)

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