A Travellerspoint blog

Entries about warships

A day in Freo

Visit to a Martime Museum with a submarine, historic prisons and a brewery

overcast 20 °C
View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

Fremantle Port (affectionately known as "'Freo" to the locals) sits at the mouth of the Swan River about 25 minutes west of Perth. It has retained its old buildings and charm and apart from the Port Authority Building itself doesn't have the skyscrapers found in Perth. A lot of migrants arrived from Europe through Fremantle including my cousins from Ireland and there are several statues of migrants around the port area. Fremantle is also home to the eye catching West Australian Maritime Museum opened in 2002 with the old museum now used as a Shipwreck Gallery. Amongst the new museum's displays is the Australia II which was the first non-American yacht to win the Americas Cup and brought the competition to Fremantle in 1987.

Fremantle Port Authority Building and the Leeuwin II Sail Training Ship

Fremantle Port Authority Building and the Leeuwin II Sail Training Ship


Migrant Statue near the Fremantle E-Sheds

Migrant Statue near the Fremantle E-Sheds


The West Australian Maritime Museum in Fremantle

The West Australian Maritime Museum in Fremantle


Sama Biasa - an Indonesian Fishing Boat confiscated for fishing in Australian waters

Sama Biasa - an Indonesian Fishing Boat confiscated for fishing in Australian waters


The 1983 Americas Cup winning yacht Australia II

The 1983 Americas Cup winning yacht Australia II

On a slipway alongside the museum there is the Oberon class submarine HMAS Ovens. It was originally commissioned in 1969 and was operational for 26 years before being handed over as a museum ship. It was a fascinating tour and left with the impression that if needed she was maintained in such good condition that she could be put to sea again.

HMAS Ovens

HMAS Ovens


Forward Torpedo Room within HMAS Ovens

Forward Torpedo Room within HMAS Ovens


Looking up inside the Coning Tower within HMAS Ovens

Looking up inside the Coning Tower within HMAS Ovens


HMAS Ovens Engine Room

HMAS Ovens Engine Room

A couple of minutes along the sea front is an odd 12 sided stone prison called the Round House, built in 1830-31 and the oldest surviving building in Western Australia. It where the first hangings in WA took place and was also used for holding aborigines before they were taken to Rottnest. In front of the Round House there is a signal canon once used for ships in the harbour to set their time and still fired daily at 1pm and underneath there is the Whalers Tunnel carved through the sandstone and used to access the beach where whales were once landed and processed.

The Round House in Fremantle

The Round House in Fremantle


The courtyard within the Round House

The courtyard within the Round House


Me by the 1pm Signal Gun near the Round House

Me by the 1pm Signal Gun near the Round House


The Round House and Whalers' Tunnel

The Round House and Whalers' Tunnel

Away from the coast is Freo's biggest tourist attraction and Western Australia's only World Heritage Site - Freemantle Prison. Built in the 1850s based on Pentonville Prison in London, it was in use right up until 1991 when a prison riot and fire exposed how out-dated it was (modern fire appliances couldn't get in the main gate).

Fremantle Prison Main Block

Fremantle Prison Main Block


Inside one of the division wings at Fremantle Prison

Inside one of the division wings at Fremantle Prison


Exercise Yard at Fremantle Prison

Exercise Yard at Fremantle Prison

As we were guided through the different parts of the prison - the different prison wings ("divisions"), exercise yards, solitary confinement block and the hanging room and the associated prison stories and superstitions - it felt like being on the location of a film set and I kept thinking of Shawshanks Redemption.

The Chapel at Fremantle Prison - note the 6th commandment reads "Thou shalt do no murder" rather than the more usual "Thou shalt not kill"

The Chapel at Fremantle Prison - note the 6th commandment reads "Thou shalt do no murder" rather than the more usual "Thou shalt not kill"


Prison superstition - 6 and 16 missing from a wall because they look like a hangman's noose

Prison superstition - 6 and 16 missing from a wall because they look like a hangman's noose


The Hanging Room at Fremantle Prison

The Hanging Room at Fremantle Prison


I escaped! Me outside Fremantle Prison Main Gate

I escaped! Me outside Fremantle Prison Main Gate

Our final stop in Freo was the Little Creatures Micro Brewery on the Esplanade. The beer tasted great and I could happily have spent hours getting quite merry on it but we needed to get back to Perth.

The Little Creatures Micro Brewery in Freo

The Little Creatures Micro Brewery in Freo


The bar inside the Little Creatures Micro Brewery

The bar inside the Little Creatures Micro Brewery

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in Australia Tagged churches museums beer harbours perth submarines prisons aborigine breweries warships americas_cup Comments (0)

Three Tours of Sydney

Open-top bus tours of Sydney and Bondi Beach plus a cruise of the Harbour

all seasons in one day 24 °C
View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

With only a limited amount of time in Sydney (and having got the Blue Mountains out of the way), I signed up for 2 days of touring Sydney and Bondi Beach by bus followed by a cruise of Sydney Harbour. Unfortunately for the open-top bus tour of Sydney it was raining, not only making the top deck seats wet but also weighing down the branches of the trees causing them to sweep the top of the bus! Sometimes when it rained we braved the weather, sometimes we dived downstairs for cover.

Open-top double-decker bus tour of Sydney - in the rain!

Open-top double-decker bus tour of Sydney - in the rain!

The tour started from the currently being restored Sydney Town Hall just across the road from the very ornate Queen Victoria Building, built in 1898 and full of speciality shops. The first place of note awe passed as we got underway was Scruffy Murphys, an Irish Bar on the edge of Chinatown. When I returned later in the evening it turned out to be a very friendly but basic rough local with good Guinness and lots of impromptu Irish singing and dancing!

Sydney Town Hall being restored

Sydney Town Hall being restored


Inside the Queen Victoria Building on George Street

Inside the Queen Victoria Building on George Street


Scruffy Murphys - the most famous Irish Bar in Sydney

Scruffy Murphys - the most famous Irish Bar in Sydney

Hyde Park (named after the famous park of the same name in London) is the oldest public parkland in Australia and marks the eastern boundary of Sydney's Central Business District (CBD). The focal point of the park is the Archibald Fountain overlooking the Roman Catholic St Marys Cathedral. The spine of the park is a pretty impressive looking avenue of fig trees.

The Archibald Fountain in Hyde Park in Sydney

The Archibald Fountain in Hyde Park in Sydney


St Marys RC Cathedral with the Archibald Fountain in Hyde Park in the foreground

St Marys RC Cathedral with the Archibald Fountain in Hyde Park in the foreground


St Marys RC Cathedral (note the fleet of vintage Rolls-Royce cars outside awaiting a wedding party!)

St Marys RC Cathedral (note the fleet of vintage Rolls-Royce cars outside awaiting a wedding party!)


The fig tree lined avenue through the centre of Hyde Park in Sydney

The fig tree lined avenue through the centre of Hyde Park in Sydney

On the south side of Hyde Park is the ANZAC War Memorial and Lake of Reflections. The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) landed on Gallipoli on the 25th April 1915 during World War I and the day has been remembered as ANZAC Day in both countries ever since. Nearby there is a statue of Captain Cook to commemorate his discovery of the east coast of Australia in 1770 and there are also very good views of the 1,014 foot (309 metre) high Sydney Tower Eye amongst the city's skyline.

The ANZAC Memorial and Lake of Reflections in Hyde Park

The ANZAC Memorial and Lake of Reflections in Hyde Park


Inside the ANZAC Memorial in Hyde Park

Inside the ANZAC Memorial in Hyde Park


Captain Cook's Statue in Hyde Park with the Sydney Tower Eye  amongst the skyline in the background

Captain Cook's Statue in Hyde Park with the Sydney Tower Eye amongst the skyline in the background

Heading east out of the CBD we passed through Kings Cross, Sydney's red light district. It was originally named Queens Cross in honour of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1897 but nearly everyone got it confused with Queens Square on Kings Street so it got renamed. Dominating the area is the iconic 42 feet (13 metre) high Coca Cola Billboard sign originally erected in 1974, it's apparently the largest billboard sign in the Southern Hemisphere but isn't heritage-listed as most people assume. Kings Cross itself surprised me with how narrow its tree lined streets were although as expected nearly every second building seemed to be a strip-club or bar touting for business!

The Coca Cola Sign at Kings Cross, the largest billboard in the Southern Hemisphere

The Coca Cola Sign at Kings Cross, the largest billboard in the Southern Hemisphere


Darlinghurst Road, Kings Cross - Sydney's Red Light District

Darlinghurst Road, Kings Cross - Sydney's Red Light District

Continuing north towards the Harbour, we passed the main east coast base of the Royal Australian Navy on the east side of Woolloomooloo Bay and also past a peculiar piece of street art of a car crushed by a large rock in the middle of the roundabout. We then caught our first sight of the two big Sydney iconic landmarks of the Opera House and Harbour Bridge although I was to get a much better view of both of these while on the Harbour Cruise the following afternoon.

HMAS Newcastle and HMAS Sydney moored up at the Naval Base on Woolloomooloo Bay

HMAS Newcastle and HMAS Sydney moored up at the Naval Base on Woolloomooloo Bay


Street art in Sydney

Street art in Sydney


The Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge

The Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge

Close by where the Hyde Park Barracks, built with convict labour in 1819 and now a world heritage site. Between 1819 and 1850 over 50,000 convicts passed through these barracks on their arrival in Australia, including potentially one of my ancestors (I found 2 convicts sharing my surname amongst the database of former inmates!). I also found the gallery on the Irish orphan women particularly interesting because of it potential relevance to my own family history. In the walls of the barracks was the An Gorta Mar, Australia's national memorial to the Irish Famine of 1845 to 1852.

Sydney's Hyde Park Barracks where 50,000 convicts were landed between 1819 and 1850

Sydney's Hyde Park Barracks where 50,000 convicts were landed between 1819 and 1850


Convict uniform on display in Sydney's Hyde Park Barracks

Convict uniform on display in Sydney's Hyde Park Barracks


Convict hammocks at the Hyde Park Barracks

Convict hammocks at the Hyde Park Barracks


The Court Room at the Hyde Park Barracks

The Court Room at the Hyde Park Barracks


An Gorta Mor - Australia's National Memorial to the Irish Famine

An Gorta Mor - Australia's National Memorial to the Irish Famine

Moving back towards the city centre is the Circular Quay, Built by convict labour in the 1850s this was the original main port for Sydney. Today it is mega busy with tourists boarding ferries going to all the different parts of the harbour as well as being where the big cruise ships (such as the "Carnival Spirit" that arrived while I was there) moor up when they are in town.

The Circular Quay from the Sydney Opera House

The Circular Quay from the Sydney Opera House


The view of the Sydney Harbour Bridge from the Circular Quay

The view of the Sydney Harbour Bridge from the Circular Quay


Aboriginal Cultural Performers on the Circular Quay

Aboriginal Cultural Performers on the Circular Quay

By the following morning the weather had returned to normal for Sydney without a cloud in the sky so I was able to take the open-top bus tour to Bondi Beach, 4 miles (7 kilometres) to the east of the city and one of the most famous beaches in the world. After enjoying a stroll along the beach for a couple of hours I caught the bus back to Sydney, catching fleeting glimpses of the city views that are the reason why this area has some of the most expensive real estate in the country.

My first view of Bondi Beach

My first view of Bondi Beach

The Lifeguard Lookout and Pavilion on Bondi Beach

The Lifeguard Lookout and Pavilion on Bondi Beach


Me by the Lifeguard Lookout on Bondi Beach

Me by the Lifeguard Lookout on Bondi Beach

Lifeguards on duty on Bondi Beach

Lifeguards on duty on Bondi Beach


Millionaires Row view of Sydney on the way back from Bondi

Millionaires Row view of Sydney on the way back from Bondi

Once back in Sydney I boarded a catermaran in the Circular Quay to do the Sydney Harbour Cruise. The first stop was Fort Denison, a martello fort about kilometre offshore built in the mid 19th century to protect Sydney. From there we sailed onwards towards the ocean past the net-protected Sharks Beach in Vaucluse before reaching the affluent suburb of Watsons Bay.

Sydney's Circular Quay

Sydney's Circular Quay


Fort Denison in the middle of Sydney Harbour

Fort Denison in the middle of Sydney Harbour


Shark Beach protected by nets

Shark Beach protected by nets


Watson Bay

Watson Bay

Watsons Bay was the furthest we travelled east towards the open ocean before we turned around. The views of Sydney, the Opera House and the Harbour Bridge as we made our way back were stunning.

Looking beyond Watson Bay towards the Ocean

Looking beyond Watson Bay towards the Ocean


Looking towards Sydney on the way back from Watson Bay

Looking towards Sydney on the way back from Watson Bay


The replica of HMS Endeavour beneath the Sydney Harbour Bridge

The replica of HMS Endeavour beneath the Sydney Harbour Bridge


Me sailing past the Sydney Opera House

Me sailing past the Sydney Opera House


The 'Carnival Spirit' Cruise Ship berthed at the Circular Quay next to the Sydney Opera House

The 'Carnival Spirit' Cruise Ship berthed at the Circular Quay next to the Sydney Opera House

After brief stops at Taronga Zoo and the Circular Quay we passed under the Harbour Bridge and turned into Darling Harbour opened in 1988. The National Maritime Museum with its impressive fleet of historical ships (including a replica of Captain Cook's HMS Endeavour) occupies the west side of the harbour while the Sydney Aquarium, Madame Tussaud's and more tourist boat jetties occupies the east side. Sydney also has a monorail which runs across Pyrmont Bridge at the bottom of Darling Harbour but this was due to close in June 2013 so I was probably one of the last to ride on it.

Replica of Captain Cook's HMS Endevour in Darling Harbour

Replica of Captain Cook's HMS Endevour in Darling Harbour


Darling Harbour and the fleet of historical ships of the National Maritime Museum from the Pyrmont Bridge

Darling Harbour and the fleet of historical ships of the National Maritime Museum from the Pyrmont Bridge

The Sydney Monorail coming into its Darling Harbour Station on Pyrmont Bridge

The Sydney Monorail coming into its Darling Harbour Station on Pyrmont Bridge


Pyrmont Bridge crossing Darling Harbour

Pyrmont Bridge crossing Darling Harbour

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in Australia Tagged beaches bridges churches buildings trains sydney museums beer boat forts cruise_ships harbours city tour videos prisons monorail aborigine solo irish_famine warships war_memorials opera_houses Comments (0)

The RMS Queen Mary

Visiting an elegant Queen and warships at Long Beach

semi-overcast 22 °C
View 2013 Round the World Trip on FrancisRTW's travel map.

Although I have been to Los Angeles three times previously visiting family I have never been to Long Beach and was keen to see the retired 1936 art deco ocean liner RMS Queen Mary that is permanently docked there. Alongside her is the Soviet Foxtrot Class b-427 Scorpion Submarine purchased from the Russians in the 1990s and also the large dome that was once used to display the Hughes H-4 Hercules "Spruce Goose" before it was sold in 1998 to the Evergreen Aviation Museum in Oregon. The Spruce Goose only flew once in 1947 (for a distance of about a mile about 70 feet above the water) and is the largest flying boat ever built with the longest wingspan of any aircraft in history.

The RMS Queen Mary berthed up at Long Beach

The RMS Queen Mary berthed up at Long Beach


The RMS Queen Mary and Soviet b-427 'Scorpion' Submarine at Long Beach

The RMS Queen Mary and Soviet b-427 'Scorpion' Submarine at Long Beach


The now empty display dome for the 'Spruce Goose' Flying Boat alongside the RMS Queen Mary

The now empty display dome for the 'Spruce Goose' Flying Boat alongside the RMS Queen Mary

We began our tour however with a visit aboard the Cold War vintage Soviet Foxtrot Class b-427 Scorpion Submarine that floats alongside the RMS Queen Mary. Launched in Leningrad in 1972 she was part of the Soviet Pacific Submarine Fleet based out of Vladivostok and was one of 79 Foxtrot Class submarines that served with the Soviet Navy before being decommissioned in 1994. She is a contemporary of the Australian Submarine HMAS Ovens I looked around in Freemantle and it was strange to think of them on opposing sides and hunting each other.

The Soviet b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside the RMS Queen Mary at Long Beach

The Soviet b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside the RMS Queen Mary at Long Beach


The Forward Torpedo Room aboard the Soviet b-427 Scorpion

The Forward Torpedo Room aboard the Soviet b-427 Scorpion


Close up of the forward torpedo tubes aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Close up of the forward torpedo tubes aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Sonar Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Sonar Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Although the Soviet submarine in the film is a nuclear attack submarine and a lot bigger, walking past the officer's ward room and then climbing through the Control Room to look through the Attack Periscope with all the Russian writing everywhere I couldn't help thinking of Sean Connery in the 1990 film "The Hunt for Red October"!

Officer's Ward Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Officer's Ward Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Hatch into the Control Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Hatch into the Control Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Me looking through the attack periscope aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Me looking through the attack periscope aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Assorted knobs at the rear of the Control Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

Assorted knobs at the rear of the Control Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

The b-427 Scorpion had a crew of 56 sailors, 10 midshipman and 12 officers and felt a lot more cramped than the HMAS Ovens. Since arriving in Long Beach with Hollywood not too far away she has appeared as a Russian, American, German and even a Japanese submarine in many films, TV shows, commercials and documentaries.

The Galley aboard the b-427 Scorpion

The Galley aboard the b-427 Scorpion


The Engine Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion

The Engine Room aboard the b-427 Scorpion


Crew bunks in the Rear Torpedo Room of the b-427 Scorpion

Crew bunks in the Rear Torpedo Room of the b-427 Scorpion

We then moved on to the main event, the RMS Queen Mary. Legend has it that she was originally going to be called the Queen Victoria but when as per protocol Cunard approached King George V for his blessing for the ship's proposed name saying, "We have decided to name our new ship after England's greatest Queen," (meaning Queen Victoria, the King's Grandmother) the King reportedly replied "My wife (Queen Mary) will be delighted that you are naming the ship after her" and so she was called the Queen Mary instead.

The view boarding the Queen Mary at Long Beach

The view boarding the Queen Mary at Long Beach


The outside Promenade Deck on the Queen Mary

The outside Promenade Deck on the Queen Mary


The Ship's Bell on the Queen Mary

The Ship's Bell on the Queen Mary


Marble Plaque and portrait of Queen Mary over the Main Staircase on the Promenade Deck

Marble Plaque and portrait of Queen Mary over the Main Staircase on the Promenade Deck

Our guide for the main "Glory Days" tour of the ship was a retired Captain who was extremely knowledgeable about the ship. The Queen Mary was built in Clydebank (Scotland) and when launched in 1936 set a new benchmark in transatlantic travel and was considered by the rich and famous as the only way to travel. On our tour (with exception of the First Class Lounge or "Queens Salon" which was closed for a private function) we were shown around all the main rooms of the ship with their luxurious art-deco furnishings.

The First Class Restaurant aboard the Queen Mary (also known as the Grand Salon)

The First Class Restaurant aboard the Queen Mary (also known as the Grand Salon)


Ornate map on the back wall of the First Class Restaurant used to show the location of the Queen Mary while crossing the Atlantic

Ornate map on the back wall of the First Class Restaurant used to show the location of the Queen Mary while crossing the Atlantic


The Observation Bar on the forward Promenade Deck

The Observation Bar on the forward Promenade Deck

Queen Mary herself appears to have only briefly visited the ship once but she proved popular with Hollywood stars such as Bob Hope and was frequently used by British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to cross the Atlantic during WWII. The Queen Mary Hotel currently features 314 of the original guest rooms including 305 staterooms and 9 full suites. Interestingly the bathroom of the suite used by Queen Mary we looked around had 4 taps - separate sets of hot and cold taps for fresh and salt water.

The Royal Suite's Bedroom aboard the Queen Mary

The Royal Suite's Bedroom aboard the Queen Mary


The Royal Suite's Day Room aboard the Queen Mary

The Royal Suite's Day Room aboard the Queen Mary


Bathroom in the Queen Mary's Royal Suite - note the 2 sets of hot and cold taps for fresh and salt water

Bathroom in the Queen Mary's Royal Suite - note the 2 sets of hot and cold taps for fresh and salt water


First class corridor stretching the length of the ship

First class corridor stretching the length of the ship

The Queen Mary also had a Travel Bureau (recently restored) for first class passengers to make hotel reservations before their arrival at their final destinations. There was also an indoor swimming pool with an art deco entrance; when we were taken inside it was very dark as these days it is used mainly on the Queen Mary's Ghost & Legends Tour which can only be described as "corny" as they try to scare people in true ghost train fashion with stories of calamities aboard the ship such as the stoker who was tragically chopped in half by a bulkhead door. The biggest disaster to befell the Queen Mary was her collision with and sinking of the British cruiser HMS Curacao off the coast of Ireland in 1942 when 331 lives were lost. This is remembered on the Ghost & Legends Tour with a recreation of flooding in the side of ship down in one of the engine rooms.

The Travel Bureau on Main Deck

The Travel Bureau on Main Deck


The art-deco entrance to the First Class Swimming Pool

The art-deco entrance to the First Class Swimming Pool


The darkened First Class Swimming Pool aboard the Queen Mary

The darkened First Class Swimming Pool aboard the Queen Mary


Simulated water flooding in the side of ship down in one of the Engine Rooms during the 'Ghost and Legends Tour'

Simulated water flooding in the side of ship down in one of the Engine Rooms during the 'Ghost and Legends Tour'

The Bridge of the ship was spacious with polished wheels and levers and had a view forward up the Los Angeles River with the b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside. Included on the deck is a Bofors Gun as used to defend the ship during WWII.

The Bridge aboard the Queen Mary

The Bridge aboard the Queen Mary


The view forward from the Bridge with the b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside

The view forward from the Bridge with the b-427 Scorpion Submarine alongside


Me on the Forward Deck of the Queen Mary

Me on the Forward Deck of the Queen Mary


WWII Bofors Gun on the deck of the Queen Mary

WWII Bofors Gun on the deck of the Queen Mary

Towards the back of the ship with a separate walkway is the "Queen Mary Story" Museum which included various models and memorabilia from the ship as well as mock ups of different types of cabins used during her history. There is also access through the museum to one of the Queen Mary's engine rooms and a propeller submerged in a tank of water to preserve it.

View back along the Queen Mary portside from outside the Bridge

View back along the Queen Mary portside from outside the Bridge


Inside an Engine Room aboard the Queen Mary

Inside an Engine Room aboard the Queen Mary


One of the Queen Mary's Propellers

One of the Queen Mary's Propellers

One of the most interesting periods in the Queen Mary's history is her involvement in WWII. The ship was called up as a troopship and affectionately known as the "Grey Ghost" for the drab shade of grey she was painted and ability to evade U-boats because of her speed. Eventually during the course of the war the Queen Mary carried more than 800,000 troops (including 16,683 on a single voyage - a record that remains to this day) and travelled more than 600,000 miles playing a significant role in virtually every major Allied campaign. Winston Churchill credited the Queen Mary with shortening the War by a year and amongst the exhibits were GI bunk beds, a gym and weaponry used during this period. After the war the Queen Mary spent the following year repatriating American troops and GI brides before finally being demobbed and returned to Cunard her owners in September 1946.

Ship Plan and Bunks as used during WWII

Ship Plan and Bunks as used during WWII


Example of the extra weaponry mounted aboard to protect the Queen Mary during WWII

Example of the extra weaponry mounted aboard to protect the Queen Mary during WWII


Gym as used by American Soldiers aboard the Queen Mary during WWII

Gym as used by American Soldiers aboard the Queen Mary during WWII


Example of a cabin used by GI Brides after WWII

Example of a cabin used by GI Brides after WWII

When the Queen Mary was put up for sale in 1967 she was purchased by the City of Long Beach to become a signature tourist attraction and high class hotel which she continues to be today. In addition to the Queen Mary Glory Days and Ghosts & Legends Tours that we signed up for there was also a Her Finest Hour: A WWII Tour and Diana: Legacy of a Princess Exhibition containing a collection of her evening gowns, dresses and other memorabilia but that was more than we could take!

Hotel Reception on 'A' Deck of the Queen Mary

Hotel Reception on 'A' Deck of the Queen Mary


Queen Elisabeth and Prince Phillip's portraits on the wall of the lobby on 'A' Deck

Queen Elisabeth and Prince Phillip's portraits on the wall of the lobby on 'A' Deck


Shops on the Promenade Deck aboard the Queen Mary

Shops on the Promenade Deck aboard the Queen Mary


Entrance to the 'Diana: Legacy of a Princess' Exhibition aboard the Queen Mary

Entrance to the 'Diana: Legacy of a Princess' Exhibition aboard the Queen Mary

As you can probably judge by the number of photographs in this entry, by the time we finished at the Queen Mary there was little time left to explore the rest of Long Beach! We did however manage to walk along the waterfront at San Pedro watching the container ships entering and leaving Los Angeles Harbor, the busiest container port in the USA and also took some photographs of the WWII Battleship USS Iowa that was berthed there. The USS Iowa closed as we got there, I guess I'll have to see if I can do a tour of one of her sister ships on the East Coast instead!

Container Ships entering and leaving Los Angeles Harbor under the Vincent Thomas Bridge (the USS Iowa can be seen on the left)

Container Ships entering and leaving Los Angeles Harbor under the Vincent Thomas Bridge (the USS Iowa can be seen on the left)


USS Iowa at San Pedro

USS Iowa at San Pedro


USS Iowa (BB-61) at San Pedro

USS Iowa (BB-61) at San Pedro

On the dock side by the bow of the USS Iowa was a 6 foot copy of Seward Johnson's iconic "Sailor kissing a Nurse" (aka "Unconditional Surrender") sculpture that seems popular alongside US Museum Ships (the original statute was 25 foot high and was based on photograph taken in Times Square New York on V-J Day 1945).

A copy of the iconic 'Sailor kissing a Nurse' statue beside the USS Iowa

A copy of the iconic 'Sailor kissing a Nurse' statue beside the USS Iowa

Posted by FrancisRTW 02:00 Archived in USA Tagged museums hotels boat california cruise_ships harbours submarines warships film_locations Comments (0)

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